Today I’m going to do some research about artist in different fields. It’s the necessary part of my holiday life. Keep on studying!


4.3D_2004-05MagicHour

David Batchelor is devoted to colour, and it has become a leitmotif in his oeuvre. Primarily known for his sculptures exploring synthetic and luminous constructs of colour, he has utilized found materials including lightboxes, industrial dollies, plastic bottles and electrical flex to consider how colour appears and is experienced in our urban environment.

Cities can be grey, homogeneous and seemingly colourless places, but they can also be filled with man-made colour which comes to life at night. His drawings looks like a handmade colour chart, or at least a group of colour samples,with dabs of paint next to the names for the colours.

batchelor-blobs2_event_image

Colour is part of our everyday world, and yet it remains utterly strange. I am totally agree with what he said, in his opinion, he thinks it is very hard to put our experience of colour into words, but this is exactly why it’s intellectually interesting, as well as vivid and sensually rich. He’s really interested in that relationship between colour and darkness and this is at the centre of what he has been thinking about. When we examine colour in nature, it is enhanced and is dependent on daylight. Colour in the city, however, is dependent on the absence of natural light, on darkness. A lot of Batchelor’s drawings use black as it’s way of bringing out colour–Matisse worked that one out a long time ago!

3.3D_2003BrickLaneRemix

Everything he has made is basically flat. Even his three-dimensional work is totally flat.There are two further trajectories that can be identified through Batchelor’s career: one being his two-dimensional graphic works, and the other his photographs of found monochromes within cities.